• Veterinary Specialists
  • Andrew Farabaugh, Veterinary Neurology, Veterinary Specialists
  • Veterinary Specialists, Veterinary Dermatology, Veterinary Ophthalmology
  • NH Veterinary Specialists, Vet Specialists
  • Veterinary Specialists, Vet Specialists, Vet Dermatology, Veterinary Cardiology
  • Jeff Vogel, Veterinary Dermatology, NH Veterinary Specialists
  • Veterinary Cardiology Services, Veterinary Specialists, SNH
  • Andrew Farabaugh, Veterinary Referral NH

LeeAnn Toolan, DVM, CVA, CVFT, CVTP

Dr. Toolan emergency medicine veterinarian & acupunctureDr. Toolan graduated from Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1993 and completed a Small Animal Internship at the University of Saskatoon in Saskatchewan, Canada in 1994.  She then practiced small animal medicine and surgery in Colorado until relocating to New Hampshire in 2001.

Dr. Toolan, has extensive training in the practice of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) and its branches of acupuncture, herbal medicine, food therapy and Tui-na (a Chinese manipulative therapy that combines chiropractic, massage and acupressure techniques.)  Here goal is to provide the best possible quality of life for the pet in a caring and compassionate setting.

Acupuncture Benefits

Neurologic Disease:  Seizures, Geriatric Dementia (CCDS), Meningioencephalitis, Vestibular Disease, Cranial Nerve Disease (mastecetory myositis, optic neuritis),  Intravertebral Disc Disease (IVDD), Fibrocartilaginous Embolism, Periferal Nerve Disease (Brachial Plexus Avulsion), Degenerative Myelopathy, EPM (Equine Protozoal Myolitis).

Musculoskelatal Disease: Arthritis (hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, spinal arthritis, knee arthritis), Tendon Sprains and partial tears (cranial cruciate injuries, achilles injuries), Luxating Patellas,  Geriatric Hind-end Weakness, and Laminitis

Gastrointestinal Disease: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Anorexia, Vomiting, Diarrhea, Constipation, Megacolon, Gastric Reflux, and Equine Colic.

Endocrine Disease: Hypothyroidism, Hyperthyroidism, Diabetes, Insulin Resistance, Cushings Disease

Other Diseases: Skin Allergies, Feline Asthma, Equine COPD, Cancer, Liver Disease, Chronic Renal Failure, FLUTD, Urinary Incontinence, Chronic Infections, Uveitis, and Chronic Corneal Ulcers.

More About Acupuncture & Holistic Techniques:
Acupuncture is an ancient medical practice that has been used on people for over 3000 years, and it is now commonly used in the veterinary treatment of animals as well.

Acupuncture is the insertion of fine needles into specific points on the body to cause a desired healing effect.  Acupuncture treatment works by stimulating the nervous system, endocrine system and immune systems in the body.

By stimulating chemicals such as endorphins and serotonin to be released by the brain, acupuncture can help control and relieve pain. Acupuncture has also been shown to support the immune system, increase white blood cell counts, improve endocrine function, relax muscles, regulate the intestinal tract, reduce inflammation, improve local blood flow and speed healing.

Acupuncture can be used to treat many different problems in animals. It is especially useful to control chronic pain and disease. It can replace western pain medicine when animals cannot take them due to kidney, liver or stomach disease. Acupuncture can support and improve organ disease when western medicine has little to offer, or help western medicine regulate diseases such as diabetes or hypothryoidism.

Acupuncture is frequently combined with other TCVM therapies such as Herbal Medicine, Food Therapy (the use of food as medicine) and Tui-na. Results are often greater when more than one modality is used.

Click Below for an Informative Video on Traditional Chinese Medicine or Type the URL Into Your Browser:  

 

 

 

 



www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTvqh7E4byo

How long is an Acupuncture Appointment?  

The first appointment is approximately 1 hour and includes a consultation, examination and is followed by the acupuncture treatment if needed.  Followup acupuncture appointments are approximately one hour as well.  Please fill out our online forms for Dr. Toolan's review prior to your first visit. 

How long does it take for acupuncture to work?

The effects of acupuncture are cumulative, such that a sequence of treatment sessions is recommended.  Frequency of treatment sessions will vary with each patient and disease.  Acupuncture can take up 3 to 5 treatments before changes are seen, so it's important to commit to a schedule in order for the treatments to have the time to work.

Departments:  

Medicine
Amy Lomas, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM
Lee Garrod, DVM, Diplomate ACVECC

Cardiopulmonary Medicine
Nonya FiakpuiVMDDiplomate ACVIM (Cardiology)

Surgery
Karen Gibson, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS
Robin ZuckermanDVM

Neurology and Neurosurgery
Anderew Farabaugh, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM
(Neurology)
 
Oncology (NEVOG)
Kim Cronin, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM, Oncology
Erin RomansikDVMDiplomate ACVIMOncology
Diagnostic Imaging
Nedra Guckert, BVetMed
Ophthalmology
Coming Soon, DVM, Diplomate ACVO
Dermatology
Jeff Vogel, DVM, Diplomate ACVD
Acupuncture/Pain Management
LeeAnn Toolan, DVM, CVA, CVFT, CVTP